Strengthening Knowledge and Awareness in Family Services of Domestic Abuse (SKAFADA)

Completed Project

This project has now been completed. The linked publication can be viewed here:

Strengthening Knowledge and Awareness in Family Services of Domestic Abuse (SKAFADA)

Summary

This protocol summarises plans for a rapid scoping review of the knowledge, understanding, and skills of the Early Help and Family Support workforces in relation to domestic abuse.

Who, what, why and how?

The Early Help and Family Support workforces have high levels of contact with families who are known to be at risk of experiencing domestic abuse. These workforces can play an important role in reducing the risk of statutory social care intervention, improving family relationships, signposting, and increasing the take-up of additional support services to meet families’ needs.

Case reviews highlight the need for professionals to have a deeper understanding of the dynamics and impact of domestic abuse on children, including post-separation contact. However, limited evidence exists regarding the knowledge and practice of Early Help/Family Support workers in general and specifically regarding families affected by domestic abuse.

To help build our understanding, we commissioned a consortium led by the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) in partnership with King College London (KCL) to conduct a rapid scoping review. This research piece will aim to provide evidence about the knowledge, understanding, and skills of the Early Help and Family Support workforces in England in relation to domestic abuse.

For the purposes of this study, ‘Early Help and Family Support Practitioners’ refers to professionals who are case-holders or those who conduct assessments, provide support services to children and families, or deliver group work programmes.

Research Questions

  1. What are the skills and knowledge of domestic abuse in the early help/family support workforces?
  2. What training/Continuing Professional Development (CPD) on domestic abuse is currently provided to the early help/family support workforces?
  3. How are the current identification/referral/knowledge /skills/ and understanding of domestic abuse assessed?
  4. What are the gaps in the knowledge/skills/understanding of domestic abuse in the early help/family support workforces?
  5. What specific domestic abuse topics/skills need to be included in training/development for the early help/family support workforces?
  6. How do specialist domestic abuse staff interact with the early help/family support workforces?
  7. What multi-agency practice models are currently used in early help/family support domestic abuse work?

Evaluation partners

Due Date

This project is due to be completed by October 2023.
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Research Protocol

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